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Apple Explores Using An iPhone, iPad To Power a Laptop

Slashdot: Your Rights Online - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 20:45
According to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Apple has filed a patent for an "Electronic accessory device." It describes a "thin" accessory that contains traditional laptop hardware like a large display, physical keyboard, GPU, ports and more -- all of which is powered by an iPhone or iPad. The device powering the hardware would fit into a slot built into the accessory. AppleInsider reports: While the accessory can take many forms, the document for the most part remains limited in scope to housings that mimic laptop form factors. In some embodiments, for example, the accessory includes a port shaped to accommodate a host iPhone or iPad. Located in the base portion, this slot might also incorporate a communications interface and a means of power transfer, perhaps Lightning or a Smart Connector. Alternatively, a host device might transfer data and commands to the accessory via Wi-Fi, Bluetooth or other wireless protocol. Onboard memory modules would further extend an iOS device's capabilities. Though the document fails to delve into details, accessory memory would presumably allow an iPhone or iPad to write and read app data. In other cases, a secondary operating system or firmware might be installed to imitate a laptop environment or store laptop-ready versions of iOS apps. In addition to crunching numbers, a host device might also double as a touch input. For example, an iPhone positioned below the accessory's keyboard can serve as the unit's multitouch touchpad, complete with Force Touch input and haptic feedback. Coincidentally, the surface area of a 5.5-inch iPhone 7 Plus is very similar to that of the enlarged trackpad on Apple's new MacBook Pro models. Some embodiments also allow for the accessory to carry an internal GPU, helping a host device power the larger display or facilitate graphics rendering not possible on iPhone or iPad alone. Since the accessory is technically powered by iOS, its built-in display is touch-capable, an oft-requested feature for Mac. Alternatively, certain embodiments have an iPad serving as the accessory's screen, with keyboard, memory, GPU and other operating guts located in the attached base portion. This latter design resembles a beefed up version of Apple's Smart Case for iPad.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Research

Social Media Info Guide to Tumblr

beSpacific - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 19:04

The Social Media Information Blog Investigator’s Guide to Tumblr – “Founded in 2007,  Tumblr is a microblogging and social networking website. The platform, which was acquired by Yahoo in 2013, allows users to share text, images, quotes, links, video, audio, and chats. Tumblr’s appeal is that it allows users to be creative and build independent content on a personalized page with little effort. How does Tumblr work? A large part of Tumblr’s appeal to its users is the simplicity and ubiquity of the features it offers. In fact, they claim on their website that “Tumblr is so easy to use that it’s hard to explain.” Despite that statement, we will give it a try anyway. Registering for Tumblr requires only a valid email address. After creating a username & password, users are provided a URL for their blog which is associated with “.tumblr.com.” Depending on how the user wishes to utilize Tumblr, they are now able to follow other users and post original content to their tumblelog. Social interactions between users may vary widely. While there is certainly overlap, most Tumblr users fall into one of two categories:

  1. Social Networking – These users are primarily interested in using Tumblr to curate content. Their usage is concentrated on interacting with other users and the content they’ve shared – commenting and connecting.
  2. Self-Publishing – These users value Tumblr’s low barrier to entry for microblogging. Their activities typically focus on publishing content to their personal pages.

Both categories of user share potentially valuable information on Tumblr. Investigators should be aware of the differences and temper their expectations based on which grouping their subject aligns themselves…”

Categories: Research

Using data and design to compare corruption and transparency across 50 U.S. states

beSpacific - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 18:48

Storybench article: “With Senate confirmation hearings for President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet picks happening this week, questions of conflicts of interest and financial disclosure are top of mind. Northeastern University journalism professors John Wihbey and Mike Beaudet, along with Information Design and Visualization professor Pedro Cruz and graduate student Irene de la Torre Arenas, recently published an analysis and visualization comparing the extent of corruption and transparency at the state level. “The State Financial Disclosure Project,” which was referenced today in The Washington Post and last October in an op-ed in The New York Times, marries the complex investigation of accountability in state politics with the creative, representational side of information design. “What we did was try and show the relationship between transparency and corruption across the 50 U.S. states,” says Wihbey, who together with Cruz sat down with Storybench to discuss the project’s origins and development…”

Categories: Research

The Compulsive Patent Hoarding Disorder

Slashdot: Your Rights Online - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 18:40
An anonymous reader shares an article: It takes money to make money. CSIR-Tech, the commercialisation arm of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), realised this the hard way when it had to shut down its operations for lack of funds. CSIR has filed more than 13,000 patents -- 4,500 in India and 8,800 abroad -- at a cost of $7.6 million over the last three years. Across years, that's a lot of taxpayers' money, which in turn means that the closing of CSIR-Tech is a tacit admission that its work has been an expensive mistake -- a mistake that we tax-paying citizens have paid for. Recently, CSIR's Director-General Girish Sahni claimed that most of CSIR's patents were "bio-data patents", filed solely to enhance the value of a scientist's resume and that the extensive expenditure of public funds spent in filing and maintaining patents was unviable. CSIR claims to have licensed a percentage of its patents, but has so far failed to show any revenue earned from the licences. This compulsive hoarding of patents has come at a huge cost. If CSIR-Tech was privately run, it would have been shut down long ago. Acquiring Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) comes out of our blind adherence to the idea of patenting as an index of innovation. The private sector commercializes patents through the licensing of technology and the sale of patented products to recover the money spent in R&D. But when the funds for R&D come from public sources, mimicking the private sector may not be the best option.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Research

Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing: House Bills to Fund Infrastructure Incentivize Tax Dodging for Biggest Multinational Corporations

Common Dreams - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 17:53
US PIRG

Rep. John Delaney (D-MD-6) introduced two infrastructure funding bills (H.R. 1669 and H.R. 1670) yesterday which would further incentivize corporate tax dodging, reward the biggest multinational corporations for stashing their profits in offshore tax havens, and replace one system riddled with tax loopholes with another.

Categories: Human Rights

Feds: We're Pulling Data From 100 Phones Seized During Trump Inauguration

Slashdot: Your Rights Online - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 17:20
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: In new filings, prosecutors told a court in Washington, DC that within the coming weeks, they expect to extract all data from the seized cellphones of more than 100 allegedly violent protesters arrested during the inauguration of President Donald Trump. Prosecutors also said that this search is validated by recently issued warrants. The court filing, which was first reported Wednesday by BuzzFeed News, states that approximately half of the protestors prosecuted with rioting or inciting a riot had their phones taken by authorities. Prosecutors hope to uncover any evidence relevant to the case. Under normal judicial procedures, the feds have vowed to share such data with defense attorneys and to delete all irrelevant data. "All of the Rioter Cell Phones were locked, which requires more time-sensitive efforts to try to obtain the data," Jennifer Kerkhoff, an assistant United States attorney, wrote. Such phone extraction is common by law enforcement nationwide using hardware and software created by Cellebrite and other similar firms. Pulling data off phones is likely more difficult under fully updated iPhones and Android devices.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Research

Here Are the 50 GOP Senators Who Just Sacrificed Your #BroadbandPrivacy to Corporate Profits

Common Dreams - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 16:45
Jon Queally, staff writer

Privacy and consumer advocates—and a seemingly endless chorus of Internet users—were expressing outrage on Thursday after the Republican-controlled U.S. Senate passed a bill that will allow powerful media corporations to collect personal data of internet users without their consent and sell that information to the "highest bidder" for profit.

Categories: Human Rights

Grassroots Resistance Credited as Republicans Forced to Postpone AHCA Vote

Common Dreams - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 16:14
Lauren McCauley, staff writer

Categories: Human Rights

'The Fight is Not Over,' Groups Vow, as State Dept Poised to Approve Keystone XL

Common Dreams - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 15:53
Nika Knight, staff writer

The State Department will announce its approval of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline on Friday, unnamed government sources told the Associated Press, after President Donald Trump ordered the department to reopen its review of the pipeline.

Categories: Human Rights

Tell the Truth and Shame the Devil

Common Dreams - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 15:25
Michael Winship

There was so much smoke being blown in Washington on Wednesday you could probably see it from the International Space Station.

And it all seemed to come from a single polluter: Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA), chair of the House Intelligence Committee. His pants were burning from one end of Pennsylvania Avenue to the other.

Categories: Human Rights

FoE Statement on Imminent Approval of Keystone XL Pipeline

Common Dreams - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 15:20
Friends of the Earth

Before Monday, State Department undersecretary for political affairs Tom Shannon is expected to sign the cross-border permit allowing the Keystone XL oil pipeline to move forward, according to news reports.
 
Friends of the Earth President Erich Pica issued the following statement in response to the State Department decision:

For almost a decade, Americans have fought to stop the dirty Keystone XL pipeline from polluting their air and water. We banded together to turn this pipeline into a leadership test on climate change and Trump flunked the exam.

Categories: Human Rights

The Bipartisan Effort against Campaigns for Corporate Responsibility

Common Dreams - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 15:19
Stephen Zunes

The Trump Administration’s efforts to legitimize the Israeli occupation and illegal settlements in the Israeli-occupied territories has received surprising bipartisan support. A series of bills passed or under consideration in Washington and in state capitols seeks to punish companies, religious denominations, academic associations, and other entities which support the use of boycotts, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) to challenge the occupation of Palestinian land.

Categories: Human Rights

People For the American Way: Democrats Should Reject Bad “Deal” on Gorsuch

Common Dreams - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 15:13
People For the American Way (PFAW)

In response to media reports that some Senate Democrats are looking to cut a deal that would allow Donald Trump’s nominee Neil Gorsuch to be confirmed to the Supreme Court, People For the American Way Executive Vice President Marge Baker issued the following statement.

Categories: Human Rights

Congress Must Investigate Collusion Between Monsanto and the EPA. Now.

Common Dreams - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 15:03
Katherine Paul

“I have cancer, and I don’t want these serious issues in HED [EPA’s Health Effects Division] to go unaddressed before I go to my grave. I have done my duty.”

It’s been four years since Marion Copley, a 30-year EPA toxicologist, wrote those words to her then-colleague, Jess Rowland, accusing him of conniving with Monsanto to bury the agency’s own hard scientific evidence that it is “essentially certain” that glyphosate, the key ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup weedkiller, causes cancer.

Categories: Human Rights

Unprecedented Opposition as Senate Votes to Approve David Friedman as Ambassador to Israel

Common Dreams - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 14:49
Jewish Voice for Peace

Following the vote to approve David Friedman as the next U.S. ambassador to Israel, Jewish Voice for Peace issued this statement from government affairs manager Rabbi Joseph Berman: 

Categories: Human Rights

BREAKING: Senate Votes to Gut Broadband Privacy Rules

Common Dreams - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 14:46
Fight for the Future

Today, the U.S. Senate voted to use the Congressional Review Act to gut the FCC’s broadband privacy rules that prevent Internet Service Providers like COmcast and Verizon from selling their customer’s personal information to advertisers without permission.

Categories: Human Rights

The Big Lie Behind Trump’s Education Budget

Common Dreams - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 14:46
Jeff Bryant

Public school supporters are angry at President Trump’s budget proposal, which plans to cut funding to the Department of Education by 13 percent – taking that department’s outlay down to the level it was

Categories: Human Rights

ACLU Comment on Senate Vote to Allow Internet Providers to Sell Consumer Data

Common Dreams - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 14:44
ACLU

The Senate voted today to pass a resolution that would overturn a Federal Communications Commission rule that requires internet service providers to get customers’ permission before they sell sensitive consumer data, such as browsing history.

Passage of the resolution by Congress could prevent the FCC from issuing rules that are substantially the same in the future.  ACLU Legislative Counsel Neema Singh Guliani issued the following statement: 

Categories: Human Rights

Approval of Disastrous Keystone XL Pipeline Imminent

Common Dreams - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 14:42
Center for Biological Diversity

In a reversal of yet another Obama administration environmental action, reports surfaced today that the Trump administration will approve the Keystone XL pipeline by Monday. The State Department, now headed by former ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson, will apparently grant a permit for the pipeline.

Categories: Human Rights

Senate Votes To Kill FCC's Broadband Privacy Rules

Slashdot: Your Rights Online - Thu, 03/23/2017 - 13:40
The Senate voted 50-48 along party lines Thursday to repeal an Obama-era law that requires internet service providers to obtain permission before tracking what customers look at online and selling that information to other companies. PCWorld adds: The Senate's 50-48 vote Thursday on a resolution of disapproval would roll back Federal Communications Commission rules requiring broadband providers to receive opt-in customer permission to share sensitive personal information, including web-browsing history, geolocation, and financial details with third parties. The FCC approved the regulations just five months ago. Thursday's vote was largely along party lines, with Republicans voting to kill the FCC's privacy rules and Democrats voting to keep them. The Senate's resolution, which now heads to the House of Representatives for consideration, would allow broadband providers to collect and sell a "gold mine of data" about customers, said Senator Bill Nelson, a Florida Democrat. Kate Tummarello, writing for EFF: [This] would be a crushing loss for online privacy. ISPs act as gatekeepers to the Internet, giving them incredible access to records of what you do online. They shouldn't be able to profit off of the information about what you search for, read about, purchase, and more without your consent. We can still kill this in the House: call your lawmakers today and tell them to protect your privacy from your ISP.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Research

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